Prince Rupert Update

Gorgets, or Crescentic Pendants/Necklaces

Posted on Jul 22, 2015 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Gorgets, or Crescentic Pendants/Necklaces

An interesting artifact from Ya asqalu’i is the large shell neck ornament known to archaeologists as a “Gorget”.  The English language name itself is interesting.  It comes from a European tradition similar ornament, the last piece of traditional armour to still be worn by (some) armies today.  In a full suit of armour, the gorget was a frontal piece that protected the neck (the word “gorging” for shoving food down one’s neck has the same root).  While most armour became obsolete with the development of firearms, the gorget became...

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Stone chipped bifaces – recycling and reuse 2,000 years ago at Ya asqalu’i, Prince Rupert Harbour

Posted on Dec 15, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Stone chipped bifaces – recycling and reuse 2,000 years ago at Ya asqalu’i, Prince Rupert Harbour

The picture on the right (click for higher resolution) has ALL the bifacially flaked stone artifacts from GbTo-13 and GbTo-54; remarkably few for an assemblage with 4,500 artifacts in total.  Of these, the top left one would normally be considered a unifacial  scraper but it has a finely bifacially flaked end.  Normally in BC assemblages, the arrow, dart, and spear points and knives that are ‘bifaces’ make up a sizable portion of artifacts found during excavations.  In Prince Rupert Harbour, they are rare, as archaeologists since the 1930s including Philip Drucker, George...

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Ancient names resurface for archaeological sites in Prince Rupert

Posted on Nov 21, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Ancient names resurface for archaeological sites in Prince Rupert

The Prince Rupert Harbour Project has been a series of exciting archaeological discoveries from its inception in 2006/2007. Only a couple of these though, matched the thrill (complete with goose bumps!) of  finding that there was not only a Tsimshian name for the site we had been excavating and analysing for so long,but there was a detailed story that incorporated the name multiple times. And not only was the name and the story of great interest in their own right, but there were obvious direct links between the stories told by the  archaeology and geological methods of learning about...

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Harpoons – some exciting insights!

Posted on Nov 6, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Harpoons – some exciting insights!

Readers may remember some of the earlier posts we did on harpoons: Line Guard Harpoons, Drilled, and Barbed Slate. Now that we’ve finished defining the areas of the sites that make sense to compare (3D archaeology) and temporal components, we are ready to do some 4D archaeology, adding in the time elements.  Some really cool patterns are starting to come out of the data.  The map below (click for full size) uses pie diagrams to show the type and number of specific harpoon types summarized by different areas and time periods.  The types that are of limited interest (like small...

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Stone Miniature Chisels

Posted on Oct 25, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Stone Miniature Chisels

Another new artifact type from the Kaien Siding project is what we have called the miniature stone chisel. Three exceptionally small, finely finished green stone and possibly basalt chisels were recovered from GbTo-54. These are highly polished on all surfaces and taper toward the distal tip (see below). All were made by incising or sawing along the long edges to groove then snap the stone, and then the point was made by grinding facets. GbTo-54:188 is complete. They must have been hafted into handles to allow fine manipulation as they are much too small to hand-hold. Functionally, they would...

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Using 3D methods to classify temporal components of the site

Posted on May 30, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Using 3D methods to classify temporal components of the site

Our most recent efforts have been to classify the site into temporal components – a very challenging task given the complex stratigraphy!  Having obtained dates from some samples, we were able to roughly subdivide the site into components by correlating the locations of the dated samples to changes in stratigraphy, shell density, and shell types.  The video below highlights one area of the site that has been subdivided in this way.  After the temporal components were defined in 3 dimensions, we could classify other data by component, e.g. artifacts (as seen in the video) & faunal...

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