Prince Rupert Update

3D archaeological data visualization

Posted on Apr 4, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

3D archaeological data visualization

While videos of  a GIS 3D screen are the way we’ve shown the data  till now, it allows for no user control other than pausing and rewinding. Alyssa has found a way to present the data in an interactive way using ArcGIS CityEngine WebViewer. This is great for the researchers working with us at other institutions on things like faunal remains, but we can also make classes of data available to blog viewers. Check out the links here: http://bit.ly/1nTlrSj Its a fair bit of data, but should take less than a minute or so on a fast connection.  This won’t work for tablets, or Internet...

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Selecting Radiocarbon Samples Using NEW 3D Method!

Posted on Mar 27, 2014 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Selecting Radiocarbon Samples Using NEW 3D Method!

When it comes to radiocarbon sampling on large scale excavations, sometimes selecting which samples will be the most valuable to your research can be a time consuming and tedious task.  Using our 3D recording excavation methods, here’s how we were able to select radio carbon samples relative to their locations in and around hearths and other features. Video by Alyssa Parker,...

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T-Shaped Mauls Part II

Posted on Dec 6, 2013 in Prince Rupert Update

T-Shaped Mauls Part II

The much anticipated second installment of the Millennia Blog’s T-Shaped Maul series is here! In our October 17th blog entry, 3D Mauls and Segmented Stones “In-Situ” , we featured two of the mauls found at site GbTo-54 in situ touching one another.  This T-Shaped Hand Maul, from site GbTo-13 ,was found on it’s own. In the earlier comments, Ken Ames asked for more on the second T-shaped maul, and we are sure this is of interest to many others. In a planned entry, we’ll show you the interesting relationship between the ’54 mauls and several other...

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3D Mauls and Segmented Stones “In-Situ”

Posted on Oct 17, 2013 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

3D Mauls and Segmented Stones “In-Situ”

Our latest 3D modelling task has involved starting to place some of the more significant artifacts into our GIS as 3D models, as close as possible to how they were oriented when they were discovered.  So far, we have 3D models of a segmented stone, a zoomorphic concretion, and three mauls now in our GIS (Geographic Information System), as shown in our two videos below.  Since our last videos, we have also added some landmarks as 3D objects: these include a big rock, the double lines of several canoe runs, the railway tracks, a pit feature and a standing stone feature near the stacked...

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Stacked Box Hearths in 3D

Posted on Sep 30, 2013 in Prince Rupert Update, What's New

Stacked Box Hearths in 3D

Here it is at last – the stacked hearths in 3D!  We have three videos for you today, highlighting the true “cool-ness” of 3D spatial data for archaeology!  While it just plain looks cool, the really cool thing is the ability to see relationships between all kinds of different things, from feature and artifacts, to stratigraphic facies,  faunal remains or sediment characteristics.  Virtually anything can be displayed combined with virtually anything else that was recorded.  When our president, Morley Eldridge, started archaeology in the late 1960s, he remembers...

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Wedge Based Whalebone Rod Harpoon Points

Posted on Sep 20, 2013 in Prince Rupert Update, Uncategorized

Here is a short entry to round out our harpoon sequence.  Next week we’ll bring you the 3-D distribution of the different harpoon types with some really amazing graphics and some notes on what we’ve learned from looking for patterns in where we found the different types. These artifact are amazing, and so clearly “North Coast”; we really never see anything quite like them on the South Coast.  The top two show the range of variation and the large size – originally they were probably 30 cm long and more!  The top one is the near-complete typical version.  They...

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